How to Use Curiosity to Predict the Future

How to Use Curiosity to Predict the Future

When do you have to predict the future? I’m not talking about the kind of tiny and important predictions we make every day like predicting whether we will get hit by a car if we cross a highway during rush hour, or whether our amorous proposals will be accepted or rejected. I’m talking about seemingly more complicated predictions. Perhaps you’re planning for an adventurous life change or launching a new venture or product. How do you personally consider what might happen?

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Simple Trick to Separate Haters and Trolls

Simple Trick to Separate Haters and Trolls

There will always be people who love to cause trouble by being more critical and threatening than our activities, creations, ideas, and products warrant. The invisibility cloak of the virtual world is often mistaken for invincibility, so people can dish the negative crap out in a way that they never would if they had to address you face-to-face. It’s good to be curious enough to differentiate between a threat and valuable feedback, but that doesn’t mean that it’s easy to tell the difference. Labeling all critics as ‘haters’ or ‘trolls’ confuses the issue.

The truth is

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Ferguson: A Trap a Day (Day 5)

How can we think more insightfully about Ferguson so we can begin to reverse cycles of distrust and violence? Perhaps elevating curiosity ahead of criticism and sneaking peeks at what the science of judgment and decision-making reveals can help us come to more insightful judgments and decisions. The Living Curiously Lifestyle will continue to curate, cultivate and share what is often trapped in the annals of academia.

If you’re just joining us, grab Day 1, then Day 2, then Day 3, and then Day 4.

Day 5:

Opinion versus Advice

I’m offering the opinion that the science of judgment and decision-making may hide valuable clues to solving huge societal problems like the one illustrated by the tragedy in Ferguson. I am not offering advice. Here’s why:

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Ferguson: A Trap a Day (Day 3)

Not only can the science of judgment and decision-making inspire you to look at the trial of Ferguson in new ways, it will allow you to examine our criminal justice system differently.

If you’re just joining us, grab Day 1 and then Day 2.

Day 3:

Framing Effect

Framing structures questions by defining what must be decided and what way criteria should be used

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Ferguson: A Trap a Day (Day 2)

The science of judgment and decision-making tells us a lot about how we view Ferguson…and may reveal hidden clues about what to do about it and other hairy societal issues.

If you’re just joining us, feel free to grab Day 1.

Day 2:

Competition v. Cooperation

Whether a situation or environment is competitive or cooperative dramatically influences our judgment and decision-making.

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